Are CDs 'Glorified Downloads'?
#1
I've come across opinions on this format from all angles, but one that's standing out as of late is that those optical discs are nothing more than storage for digital data. In all actuality, this isn't too far-fetched as one might assume. Unlike vinyl and turntables, you could get optimal sound quality out of a standard CD player. Beyond that, you can only hear a difference when you upgrade receivers, speakers, headphones, and such in order to hear the tidbits that your ears probably didn't pick up initially.

Everyone knows that a shitty turntable isn't going to cut it for vinyl, but beyond that, the stylus is the deciding factor. Ensuring that you only get the best-possible sound quality, it can make a world of difference in regards to pushing vinyl to its limits. It obviously isn't a format that you play hundreds of times daily, and even then, you're going to notice a gradual fidelity decline. That's why if you ever buy sealed vinyl and decide to play it on your rig, it's a good idea to create a lossless backup. That's what I did with cassettes when I collected music on that format, since I only ever got into them for their very cheap prices -- plenty of old school death metal and thrash metal classics included, so I had that advantage over paying twenty dollars per reissue on CD (I don't think remasters in general are necessary).

So, would it be fair to conclude that buying a CD is basically the equivalent of having a physical repository of digital music? I concur, but it's not the reason why I collect in the first place. I do it for the physical aspects. They may not be analog in the same way that vinyl or cassettes are, but in the long run, they can do more good in terms of conservation. You could rip it once and throw it back in your shelf, or you could listen to it the "vinyl" way.
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#2
CDs are digital audio, so it's not really an absurd take. I view it the other way around though. Downloads (assuming lossless of course) are just CDs without the disc. Most of this stuff is all sourced from the CD anyway.
Occasionally, I write Western and Japanese music reviews.
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#3
I could see that for sure. Just like whether or not the glass is half empty or half full.

Such a claim is usually uttered by vinyl junkies, so whatever makes them feel better. Laugh
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#4
The simple answer is no, they're not, they have their charm just like any physical format.
FinalShawn wrote:From that list, I chose Death...

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#5
(08-28-2019, 01:21 PM)Too Dark Park Wrote: The simple answer is no, they're not, they have their charm just like any physical format.

This.

But I also had the more philosophical thought that by virtue of pre-dating "downloads," CDs could never really be considered a version of such.
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#6
Perhaps it could make sense when we compare CD pressings before and after 1995. I'm talking about the proliferation of CD-Rs and using MP3s and/or other lossy audio codecs to press CDs officially. That seems to be more common with the basement dweller black metal projects, just as cheap cassettes were used to promote their stuff.
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#7
In a way....yes, because you can download the data from the disc when it's ripped. Can be said about anything on a disc, but I think having a physical copy of something or in this case a CD, with the artwork, etc is more meaningful then a download. I mean if I could have a physical version of a lot of the music I have digitally? That would be cool, but I am not a millionaire....yet.
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